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Software engineering / Ian Sommerville

Sommerville, Ian.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBook; Format: print Series: International computer science series.Publisher: Wokingham, England [etc.] : Addison-Wesley, 1995Edition: 5th. ed.Description: XVI, 742 p.ISBN: 0-201-42765-6.Subject(s): Ingeniería del software
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Item type Home library Call number Status Loan Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografías 03. BIBLIOTECA INGENIERÍA PUERTO REAL
681.3/SOM/sof (Browse shelf) Checked out PREST. LIBROS 31/01/2020 3702445308
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This revision introduces a spectrum of software engineering techniques which can be applied to practical software projects. This fifth edition features seven new chapters on areas such as computer-based systems engineering, requirements analysis, managing people, quality management and software re-engineering. The coverage of CASE and software evolution has been updated, and project management topics are dealt with early on in the book as a framework for project-oriented courses. Program examples are provided in C++ as well as Ada.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. v)
  • Part 1 Overview (p. 1)
  • Chapter 1 Introduction (p. 3)
  • 1.1 FAQs about software engineering (p. 5)
  • 1.2 Professional and ethical responsibility (p. 14)
  • Key points (p. 17)
  • Further reading (p. 18)
  • Exercises (p. 18)
  • Chapter 2 Computer-based system engineering (p. 20)
  • 2.1 Emergent system properties (p. 22)
  • 2.2 Systems and their environment (p. 24)
  • 2.3 System modelling (p. 26)
  • 2.4 The system engineering process (p. 29)
  • 2.5 System procurement (p. 37)
  • Key points (p. 39)
  • Further reading (p. 40)
  • Exercises (p. 40)
  • Chapter 3 Software processes (p. 42)
  • 3.1 Software process models (p. 44)
  • 3.2 Process iteration (p. 51)
  • 3.3 Software specification (p. 55)
  • 3.4 Software design and implementation (p. 56)
  • 3.5 Software validation (p. 60)
  • 3.6 Software evolution (p. 63)
  • 3.7 Automated process support (p. 63)
  • Key points (p. 68)
  • Further reading (p. 68)
  • Exercises (p. 69)
  • Chapter 4 Project management (p. 71)
  • 4.1 Management activities (p. 73)
  • 4.2 Project planning (p. 75)
  • 4.3 Project scheduling (p. 78)
  • 4.4 Risk management (p. 84)
  • Key points (p. 90)
  • Further reading (p. 91)
  • Exercises (p. 92)
  • Part 2 Requirements (p. 95)
  • Chapter 5 Software requirements (p. 97)
  • 5.1 Functional and non-functional requirements (p. 100)
  • 5.2 User requirements (p. 106)
  • 5.3 System requirements (p. 109)
  • 5.4 The software requirements document (p. 115)
  • Key points (p. 119)
  • Further reading (p. 119)
  • Exercises (p. 120)
  • Chapter 6 Requirements engineering processes (p. 121)
  • 6.1 Feasibility studies (p. 123)
  • 6.2 Requirements elicitation and analysis (p. 124)
  • 6.3 Requirements validation (p. 137)
  • 6.4 Requirements management (p. 139)
  • Key points (p. 145)
  • Further reading (p. 145)
  • Exercises (p. 146)
  • Chapter 7 System models (p. 148)
  • 7.1 Context models (p. 150)
  • 7.2 Behavioural models (p. 153)
  • 7.3 Data models (p. 158)
  • 7.4 Object models (p. 160)
  • 7.5 CASE workbenches (p. 166)
  • Key points (p. 168)
  • Further reading (p. 169)
  • Exercises (p. 169)
  • Chapter 8 Software prototyping (p. 171)
  • 8.1 Prototyping in the software process (p. 174)
  • 8.2 Rapid prototyping techniques (p. 180)
  • 8.3 User interface prototyping (p. 188)
  • Key points (p. 189)
  • Further reading (p. 190)
  • Exercises (p. 190)
  • Chapter 9 Formal specification (p. 192)
  • 9.1 Formal specification in the software process (p. 194)
  • 9.2 Interface specification (p. 197)
  • 9.3 Behavioural specification (p. 204)
  • Key points (p. 209)
  • Further reading (p. 210)
  • Exercises (p. 210)
  • Part 3 Design (p. 213)
  • Chapter 10 Architectural design (p. 215)
  • 10.1 System structuring (p. 219)
  • 10.2 Control models (p. 224)
  • 10.3 Modular decomposition (p. 229)
  • 10.4 Domain-specific architectures (p. 233)
  • Key points (p. 236)
  • Further reading (p. 237)
  • Exercises (p. 237)
  • Chapter 11 Distributed systems architectures (p. 239)
  • 11.1 Multiprocessor architectures (p. 243)
  • 11.2 Client-server architectures (p. 244)
  • 11.3 Distributed object architectures (p. 249)
  • 11.4 CORBA (p. 252)
  • Key points (p. 257)
  • Further reading (p. 258)
  • Exercises (p. 258)
  • Chapter 12 Object-oriented design (p. 260)
  • 12.1 Objects and object classes (p. 262)
  • 12.2 An object-oriented design process (p. 267)
  • 12.3 Design evolution (p. 280)
  • Key points (p. 282)
  • Further reading (p. 282)
  • Exercises (p. 283)
  • Chapter 13 Real-time software design (p. 285)
  • 13.1 System design (p. 287)
  • 13.2 Real-time executives (p. 291)
  • 13.3 Monitoring and control systems (p. 295)
  • 13.4 Data acquisition systems (p. 300)
  • Key points (p. 303)
  • Further reading (p. 303)
  • Exercises (p. 304)
  • Chapter 14 Design with reuse (p. 306)
  • 14.1 Component-based development (p. 310)
  • 14.2 Application families (p. 318)
  • 14.3 Design patterns (p. 322)
  • Key points (p. 325)
  • Further reading (p. 325)
  • Exercises (p. 326)
  • Chapter 15 User interface design (p. 327)
  • 15.1 User interface design principles (p. 330)
  • 15.2 User interaction (p. 332)
  • 15.3 Information presentation (p. 334)
  • 15.4 User support (p. 340)
  • 15.5 Interface evaluation (p. 345)
  • Key points (p. 347)
  • Further reading (p. 348)
  • Exercises (p. 348)
  • Part 4 Critical Systems (p. 351)
  • Chapter 16 Dependability (p. 353)
  • 16.1 Critical systems (p. 356)
  • 16.2 Availability and reliability (p. 359)
  • 16.3 Safety (p. 364)
  • 16.4 Security (p. 367)
  • Key points (p. 369)
  • Further reading (p. 369)
  • Exercises (p. 370)
  • Chapter 17 Critical systems specification (p. 371)
  • 17.1 Software reliability specification (p. 373)
  • 17.2 Safety specification (p. 379)
  • 17.3 Security specification (p. 387)
  • Key points (p. 389)
  • Further reading (p. 389)
  • Exercises (p. 390)
  • Chapter 18 Critical systems development (p. 392)
  • 18.1 Fault minimisation (p. 393)
  • 18.2 Fault tolerance (p. 400)
  • 18.3 Fault-tolerant architectures (p. 410)
  • 18.4 Safe system design (p. 413)
  • Key points (p. 414)
  • Further reading (p. 415)
  • Exercises (p. 415)
  • Part 5 Verification and Validation (p. 417)
  • Chapter 19 Verification and validation (p. 419)
  • 19.1 Verification and validation planning (p. 423)
  • 19.2 Software inspections (p. 425)
  • 19.3 Automated static analysis (p. 431)
  • 19.4 Cleanroom software development (p. 434)
  • Key points (p. 437)
  • Further reading (p. 438)
  • Exercises (p. 438)
  • Chapter 20 Software testing (p. 440)
  • 20.1 Defect testing (p. 442)
  • 20.2 Integration testing (p. 452)
  • 20.3 Object-oriented testing (p. 458)
  • 20.4 Testing workbenches (p. 462)
  • Key points (p. 464)
  • Further reading (p. 465)
  • Exercises (p. 466)
  • Chapter 21 Critical systems validation (p. 467)
  • 21.1 Formal methods and critical systems (p. 469)
  • 21.2 Reliability validation (p. 470)
  • 21.3 Safety assurance (p. 476)
  • 21.4 Security assessment (p. 483)
  • Key points (p. 484)
  • Further reading (p. 484)
  • Exercises (p. 485)
  • Part 6 Management (p. 487)
  • Chapter 22 Managing people (p. 489)
  • 22.1 Limits to thinking (p. 490)
  • 22.2 Group working (p. 497)
  • 22.3 Choosing and keeping people (p. 503)
  • 22.4 The People Capability Maturity Model (p. 506)
  • Key points (p. 508)
  • Further reading (p. 509)
  • Exercises (p. 509)
  • Chapter 23 Software cost estimation (p. 511)
  • 23.1 Productivity (p. 513)
  • 23.2 Estimation techniques (p. 518)
  • 23.3 Algorithmic cost modelling (p. 520)
  • 23.4 Project duration and staffing (p. 531)
  • Key points (p. 533)
  • Further reading (p. 533)
  • Exercises (p. 534)
  • Chapter 24 Quality management (p. 535)
  • 24.1 Quality assurance and standards (p. 539)
  • 24.2 Quality planning (p. 544)
  • 24.3 Quality control (p. 546)
  • 24.4 Software measurement and metrics (p. 547)
  • Key points (p. 555)
  • Further reading (p. 555)
  • Exercises (p. 556)
  • Chapter 25 Process improvement (p. 557)
  • 25.1 Process and product quality (p. 560)
  • 25.2 Process analysis and modelling (p. 562)
  • 25.3 Process measurement (p. 566)
  • 25.4 The SEI Process Capability Maturity Model (p. 568)
  • 25.5 Process classification (p. 573)
  • Key points (p. 576)
  • Further reading (p. 576)
  • Exercises (p. 577)
  • Part 7 Evolution (p. 579)
  • Chapter 26 Legacy systems (p. 581)
  • 26.1 Legacy system structures (p. 583)
  • 26.2 Legacy system design (p. 587)
  • 26.3 Legacy system assessment (p. 592)
  • Key points (p. 598)
  • Further reading (p. 599)
  • Exercises (p. 599)
  • Chapter 27 Software change (p. 601)
  • 27.1 Program evolution dynamics (p. 603)
  • 27.2 Software maintenance (p. 605)
  • 27.3 Architectural evolution (p. 614)
  • Key points (p. 620)
  • Further reading (p. 620)
  • Exercises (p. 621)
  • Chapter 28 Software re-engineering (p. 622)
  • 28.1 Source code translation (p. 626)
  • 28.2 Reverse engineering (p. 628)
  • 28.3 Program structure improvement (p. 629)
  • 28.4 Program modularisation (p. 632)
  • 28.5 Data re-engineering (p. 634)
  • Key points (p. 638)
  • Further reading (p. 639)
  • Exercises (p. 639)
  • Chapter 29 Configuration management (p. 641)
  • 29.1 Configuration management planning (p. 644)
  • 29.2 Change management (p. 647)
  • 29.3 Version and release management (p. 650)
  • 29.4 System building (p. 655)
  • 29.5 CASE tools for configuration management (p. 656)
  • Key points (p. 660)
  • Further reading (p. 661)
  • Exercises (p. 661)
  • References (p. 663)
  • Index (p. 679)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ian Sommerville is Professor of Software Engineering at Lancaster University, England

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