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The empowered self : law and society in the age of individualism / Thomas M. Franck.

Franck, Thomas M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBook; Format: print Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2001Description: xiii, 312 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0199248095.Subject(s): Individualismo | Nacionalismo | Identidad (Psicologia) | Identidad colectiva | Nacionalidad | Derechos políticos y civiles | Derechos humanosDDC classification: 302.5/4
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Monografías 01. BIBLIOTECA CAMPUS JEREZ
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The Empowered Self: Law and Society in the Age of Individualism examines the gradual emancipation of the individual in national and international law and the changing social attitudes towards personal choice in constituting identity. It demonstrates that this desire of persons for choice isnot limited to Western industrial society but a historical development powered by such independent variables as urbanization, the communications revolution, education, and economic development. These factors are changing the way persons affiliate: their attitudes towards nationality, religion,careers, sexuality, and gender roles. In the new climate of personal freedom, individuals increasingly select the components of their identity, choosing one or several from among multiple possible affiliations and questioning---even sometimes rejecting---the imposed or inherited forms ofsocialization, but despite such resistance, Thomas Franck demonstrates that we are now entering the age of the individual.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • 1. Tribe, Nation, State: Traditional Forms of Imposed Identity (p. 1)
  • 1. The Thesis (p. 1)
  • 2. Why We Ask Who We Are Now (p. 3)
  • 3. The Traditional Categories of Identity: Nations and States (p. 6)
  • 4. The Many Faces of Nationalism (p. 17)
  • 2. The Dreary Future of Imposed Identity: A World of 2,000 States? (p. 21)
  • 1. Nationalism as Identity Today (p. 21)
  • 2. A World of 2,000 Nation-States (p. 25)
  • 3. The Global System as Paradox (p. 29)
  • 4. Counter-Indications: The Emerging Self in Self-Determination (p. 35)
  • 3. A Different Future: Individualism as Identity (p. 38)
  • 1. Identity in the Post-Cold War Era (p. 38)
  • 2. One-Size-Fits-All Identity (p. 40)
  • 3. The Values Underlying Identity Choices (p. 44)
  • 4. The Ebb and Flow of Affinity: Some Hypotheses (p. 49)
  • 5. Multivariegated Identity and Loyalty (p. 51)
  • 6. Loyalty Referents (p. 52)
  • 7. Exclusive/Inclusive Loyalty Compacts (p. 59)
  • 4. Citizenship: An Instance of Identity as a Personal Act of Self-Determination (p. 61)
  • 1. Multiple Loyalty References (p. 61)
  • 2. Multiple Citizenship (p. 63)
  • 3. Autonomy Versus Anomie (p. 74)
  • 5. Community Based on Personal Autonomy (p. 76)
  • 1. From Traditional Community to Personal Autonomy (p. 76)
  • 2. Personal Autonomy's Critics (p. 83)
  • 3. From Personal Autonomy to New Community (p. 85)
  • 4. The Language and Culture Problem (p. 95)
  • 5. What Is Emerging: Post Post-Modernity (p. 98)
  • 6. Freedom of Conscience: A 'Western' Value? (p. 101)
  • 1. The Autonomous Conscience (p. 101)
  • 2. The Postwar Empowering of Individual Conscience (p. 101)
  • 3. Origins, Forces, and Factors (p. 104)
  • 4. The Opposition to Freedom of Conscience (p. 109)
  • 5. The Latitudinal Evidence (p. 115)
  • 6. The Longitudinal Evidence of History (p. 123)
  • 7. The Road to Toleration: Historic Parallels and Independent Variables (p. 141)
  • 8. Conclusions (p. 145)
  • 7. Constructing the Self: Name, Gender, Career, and Privacy (p. 150)
  • 1. Introduction (p. 150)
  • 2. Personal Autonomy in Choice of Name (p. 151)
  • 3. Personal Choice and Adaption of Sexual Identity (p. 162)
  • 4. Personal Autonomy in Choice of Career (p. 177)
  • 5. A Right to Privacy? (p. 191)
  • 8. The Individual as Emerging Rights-Holder (p. 196)
  • 1. From Ward of the State to Shareholder in a Global System (p. 196)
  • 2. The ICCPR System and Its Progeny (p. 202)
  • 3. Tackling Underlying Social and Economic Causes of Victimization (p. 214)
  • 4. The Resolution 1503 System (p. 217)
  • 5. Human Rights Responsibility of the World Bank (p. 218)
  • 6. Some Protective Commonalities (p. 220)
  • 7. Organizing the Shareholders: Networks for the Protection of Personal Autonomy (p. 221)
  • 9. The Individual against the Group (p. 224)
  • 1. Triad: the State, the Group, and the Individual (p. 224)
  • 2. Equality vs. Autonomy in Group Rights Strategy (p. 225)
  • 3. The League Regime of Group Rights (p. 228)
  • 4. The United Nations Regime of Autonomous Individual Rights: A Challenge to Both Groups and States (p. 235)
  • 5. The Zeitgeist and the New Triad (p. 241)
  • 6. Group-Rights Claimants and Individualists: the Contrast (p. 244)
  • 7. Principles and Fulcrums: Reaching Triadial Balance (p. 246)
  • 8. Moral Priority of Individual Rights (p. 252)
  • 10. Personal Freedom, Personal Responsibility, and their Democratic Reconciliation (p. 255)
  • 1. Freedom From/Freedom To (p. 255)
  • 2. Discursive Requisite/Democratic Entitlement (p. 260)
  • 3. The Etymology of Democracy (p. 262)
  • 4. The Normativity of Democracy (p. 263)
  • 5. Monitoring Compliance with the Democratic Entitlement (p. 267)
  • 6. Enforcing Democracy (p. 272)
  • 7. When Democracy Is Not Enough (p. 275)
  • 8. Conclusions (p. 276)
  • 11. Summing Up (p. 278)
  • Index (p. 287)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas M. Franck is Professor of Law and Director of the Center for International Studies at New York University

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