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Conflict management for libraries : strategies for a positive, productive workplace / Jack G. Montgomery and Eleanor I. Cook ; with contributions by Pat Wagner and Glenda Hubbard

Montgomery, Jack G.
Contributor(s): Cook, Eleanor I.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBook; Format: print Publisher: Chicago : American Library Association, 2005Description: XII, 207 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0-8389-0890-X.Subject(s): Bibliotecas -- Personal -- Gestión | Gestión de conflictos
List(s) this item appears in: libros
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Item type Home library Call number Status Loan Date due Barcode Item holds
Monografías 07. BIBLIOTECA CIENCIAS SOCIALES
08/3-020 (Browse shelf)   Shelving location | Bibliomaps® PREST. LIBROS 3741289832
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

While projecting a calm and peacefulness, libraries are not immune to workplace stress and conflict. In a research survey conducted over three years, the authors asked, What are the common causes of workplace conflict in libraries? From the results of the study, as well as formal and informal observations, the authors have developed 17 scenarios of library workplace conflict, along with realistic ways to manage them. Drawing on these stories from the trenches, expert counsel from a human resources counselor and managerial consultant, and their own years of experience, the authors share three distinctive points of view for a balanced perspective to reconcile even the stickiest situation. They offer an array of tools to create a positive working environment, stay on track with achieving goals, and live the mission of the library. tips to help you: Understand the roots of conflict that typically arise every day in libraries; Anticipate and prepare to manage problems when they appear; Use appropriate strategies to work successfully with all parties; Choose from a variety approaches to dissipate conflict; Library administrators, directors, managers, and supervisors in any library setting will find a valuable framework for understanding, interpreting, and defusing workplace conflicts using these library-specific examples.

Indice

Bibliografía: p. 195-201

While projecting a calm and peacefulness, libraries are not immune to workplace stress and conflict. In a research survey conducted over three years, the authors asked, "What are the common causes of workplace conflict in libraries?" From the results of the study, as well as formal and informal observations, the authors have developed 17 scenarios of library workplace conflict, along with realistic ways to manage them. Drawing on these stories from the trenches, expert counsel from a human resources counselor and managerial consultant, and their own years of experience, the authors share three distinctive points of view for a balanced perspective to reconcile even the stickiest situation. They offer an array of tools to create a positive working environment, stay on track with achieving goals, and live the mission of the library.Helping to build a healthy working environment, they supply the necessary tips to help you: Understand the roots of conflict that typically arise every day in libraries; Anticipate and prepare to manage problems when they appear; Use appropriate strategies to work successfully with all parties; Choose from a variety approaches to dissipate conflict; Library administrators, directors, managers, and supervisors in any library setting will find a valuable framework for understanding, interpreting, and defusing workplace conflicts using these library-specific examples.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Even in the best of workplaces, conflict is inevitable. Though frequently addressed in the business world, conflict management appears only occasionally in the library press, making this book a welcome addition. Montgomery (collection services coordinator, Western Kentucky Univ.) and Cook (serials coordinator, Appalachian State Univ. Lib.) devote about half of their book to 17 case studies illustrating various types of workplace conflicts; the other half covers issues that can contribute to such conflict (e.g., personal baggage, unions, and violence) or ameliorate it (emotional intelligence, planning, organizational culture, leadership). Running the gamut from routine performance problems to illegal behavior, the case studies, composites of real incidents reported by survey respondents, are entertaining as well as informative. Each case study is followed by analyses from two consultants, plus recommendations from the authors. The consultants often seem to read more into a situation than the evidence warrants--not every instance of bad behavior requires an elaborate new training program or a referral to an employee assistance counselor. But these analyses encourage the reader to look at more than just the immediate crisis, address underlying issues, and thereby reduce future conflict. For graduate and professional collections.--Janet A. Crum, Oregon Health & Science Univ. Lib., Portland (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

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